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David CareyAt the Army Navy Country Club in Washington, D.C. in 1993.  The president was playing golf and heard a seniors tennis tournament was being played and a fellow Rhodes Scholar was playing.
University of British Columbia, 1938, B.A., History
University of Oxford, 1938-1939, Philosophy, Politics & Economics

David Carey was born in 1913 in Malaysia to British parents.  For most of his elementary and secondary education, he attended boys’ boarding schools in England.  When he was seventeen, his family immigrated to Canada.  World War II started while he was attending Oxford University as a Canadian Rhodes Scholar.  He decided leave school in order to enlist, but did not qualify for military service because of cancer.  During the war, he worked for the Canadian Department of Labor.  After the war, he spent about twenty-five years volunteering and working for Moral Re-Armament.  Carey worked another fifteen years as the public relations director for Up With People, a spin-off of MRA.  In 1983, he retired to Asheville, North Carolina.  Besides having an active civic life in his retirement, he is known for his tennis ability.  He started playing tennis regularly at the age of 65 and he has won 31 USTA national senior championships in singles and doubles.  He won the 2000 world singles title in the 85-age bracket and has held the number one US ranking in the ninety-year-old age group.  Regarding playing in the men’s 90 division, he is quoted as saying, “Yes, there were more than two of us playing in all these tournaments!”  When the weather is okay, he plays tennis three, or four times a week.

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Gerrit Gong
Brigham Young University, 1977, B.A., University Studies and Asian Studies
University of Oxford, 1979 & 1980, M. Phil. & D. Phil., International Relations

Gerrit Gong was born and raised in Palo Alto, California.  He is the eldest of three siblings.  Both of his parents were educators.  His father was a university professor and his mother was an elementary school teacher.  He has taught at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and and Brigham Young University.  In the mid ‘80s, he worked for the U.S. government as special assistant to the Undersecretary of State at the State Department and special assistant to the U.S. ambassador in Beijing, China.  At the time of this interview, he was the assistant to the president of Brigham Young University in Utah, focusing on planning and assessment.  He is now a general authority of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

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